why we sail



The wind blows with 40 knots gusting 55, surrounded by 8m swells the whitecaps look like bloody mountains. Every now and then, another breaker washes over the entire length of the boat. I am hanging on for my dear life, not literally, just mentally, because I am on a 27 ton, 57-foot sloop, and she was built for this. Not once do I ask myself, "Why am I doing this?" or "Why am I here?". All that comes to my mind is how powerful nature is and what an insignificant little blob in the dark blue I am.


So, why do we sail?

The longing for the open expanse drives sailors out to sea again and again. As soon as the lines are untied, the worries and troubles of life on land drift away from us. Suddenly life obeys other laws, and you become insignificant.


You feel in harmony with wind and sea, you learn to read clouds and wave patterns, and have a constant but silent dialogue with your vessel.


Of course, there is a destination, routes are charted, and winds predicted, but it is really about being on the way. Paying attention to currents and weather changes. The sea is constantly changing. You are alert, and you feel alive. Even during a squall, the beauty of nature fills you with awe.


Once you reach your anchorage, an incredible feeling takes over. You feel cleaned. Not one ounce of stress.


But it is not long before the longing for the sea awakens again.


We sail because sailboats can talk. Because there are storms. Because weather reports don't always lie. Because there are light winds. Because in reality there are many more stars. Because sea legs grow. Because you can anchor. Because you can race. Because there is no better place to sleep than on a boat. Because sailors are dreamers. Because the ocean talks. Because the great explorers were sailors. Because you'll meet dolphins. Because you will understand why we need to treat our planet better. Because everything can be repaired, even your soul. Because you become a different person. Because you can spot the green flash at sunset.


Why do you sail?


Fair winds!